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#11
TeamSpirit

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Saviez-vous mes bons amis que déjà dans la ligue midget AAA la charge par derière est une expulsion automatique de partie sans suspension à la première offense mais que si cela perdure des sanctions s'appliquent...

À quand le hockey redeviendra un sport de vitesse et de finesse. Bergeron était en position de vulnérabilité à un pied de la bande, penché et sans vitesse. Le défenseur face au jeu aurait pu tout de même lui soutirer la rondelle en usant d'astuce, d'habileté et sans le frapper par derrière puisque Bergeron était dos à lui... Cette situation de jeu est courrante mais la seule façon de changer les habitudes est de sanctionner la charge par en arrière. "Back charge" Pour moi un geste comme celui là n'a pas sa place.

Et à ceux qui diront que le hockey n'est pas un sport de moumoune, je répond que le hockey n'est pas non plus un sport d'hypocrite encore moins de mercenaire...

#12
sob

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tenez... allez lire un article sur ce que nos voisins de l'ontario qui ont du hockey contact pensent....surprenant messieurs..

Très bon article...

http://www.afterthew... ... gissue.htm

#13
sob

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en voici un autre ..plus médical..


http://www.cbc.ca/he... ... 60206.html

ceci est mon opinion

#14
TeamSpirit

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...très très intéressant comme article. Tu sais SOB en lisant cet article j'ai eu une petite pensée pour les Russes qui ont affrontées les "Broad Street Bullies"... Et je crois que cet article concorde tout à fait avec le changements de garde du hockey professionel soit l'intimidation rien à voir avec le sport de vitesse et de finesse mais comme le dénonce l'article perte de focus des vrais habileté nécessaire pour bien pratiquer le hockey.

Une bonne rélexion à faire...


#15
sob

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et un autre dernier qui fait encore plus réfléchir


CBC program shows why imaginative hockey has disappeared
by William Houston - - From Saturday's Globe and Mail


After the media analyzed Canada's 3-2 loss to Russia in the gold-medal game of the world junior hockey championship, the consensus seemed to be that it had been, after all, a one-goal game. It could have gone either way. The Russians were "slightly" more skilled than the Canadians.

But there were dissenters. Some felt Canada's goalie, Marc-André Fleury, had kept the team in the game. Others believed that, among the forwards, the talent gap between Canada and Russia was substantial. The problem was, if you expressed that view, you were likely to be accused by the hockey establishment and its media of being seditious, unpatriotic and, worse, left wing.

When a caller to the sports talk radio station in Toronto, The Fan, wondered why Canada, which is obsessed with hockey, can't dominate international tournaments, host Roger Lajoie quickly reminded him that Russia has a population of 500 million compared to Canada's 30 million.

Actually, Russia's population is 145 million. And, if you want numbers, consider these: There are more than 3,000 arenas used for hockey in Canada compared with only 1,000 in all of Europe. And there are 3.5 times as many children playing hockey in Canada as in Sweden, Finland, the Czech Republic, Slovakia and Russia combined.

Here's something else to ponder: When is the last time a player with spectacular skills — somebody who did things on the ice that were just amazing — entered the National Hockey League? Over the past 15 years, we would suggest there has been Jaromir Jagr (Czech Republic), Pavel Bure (Russia) and perhaps Sergei Fedorov (Russia). Of the newcomers, there is Atlanta star Ilya Kovalchuk (Russia) and Marian Gaborik of Minnesota (Czech Republic).

When's the last time a Canadian forward came into the league and wowed us with extraordinary, mind-boggling talent? It was Mario Lemieux, who entered the NHL 19 years ago. He was preceded by the pantheon of Canadian legends — Wayne Gretzky, Guy Lafleur, Bobby Orr and on and on.

But Canada no longer produces superstars with breath-taking, knock-your-socks-off ability, and the many of the reasons for this were addressed on television this week by journalist Ed Arnold, who coached a team of novices in Peterborough, Ont., and wrote a book about the season titled, Whose Puck Is It Anyway? In an interview with Allan Gregg on TV Ontario, Arnold noted that youth coaches stress winning above everything else. Kids are discouraged from thinking, using their imagination or being creative. They don't learn how to adequately stickhandle, pass or make plays. Participating in minor hockey is about coping in a rigidly structured environment, sometimes dealing with abuse from coaches and parents, learning systems, playing defensive hockey and being physical, because that's how to win games. Great fun for a child, eh?

If you want to learn more on how walls are thrown up to stop a child in Canada from enjoying the game and becoming a skilled player, tune into the CBC's Disclosure Tuesday at 9 p.m. local times.

Disclosure probes the decision by the Canadian Hockey Association to allow bodychecking for nine and 10 year olds. Now, if you want to discourage a smallish-sized kid, who has some talent, from skating, carrying the puck and doing interesting things with it, just raise the spectre of him getting creamed by somebody twice his size every time he gets near the play. That's a surefire way to get somebody enthusiastic about taking up skiing. Not that he would be on the team anyway, given the importance minor-hockey coaches place on size, even at the eight-year-old level.

Disclosure will report that the CHA based its decision to allow bodychecking on an Ontario study that concluded, wrongly and with bad information, that bodychecking is safe for children. In fact, the opposite is true. Injuries are increasing. Players are getting hurt.

"The kids out there are living the results of this flawed study," said Disclosure host Mark Kelley. "Nine and 10 year olds are now the legacy of it, and it's pretty dangerous."

The proponents will argue that bodychecking is a skill and that it should be learned at an early age to prevent later injuries. And, of course, being physical is also the Canadian way to play the game. But that's just baloney. On the list of "skills" it ranks at the bottom and can easily be picked up at the age of 13 or 14. Kids don't bodycheck in European hockey and the Europeans are doing quite well in junior hockey and the NHL, thank you very much.

The bodychecking issue is just one example of the lunacy that pervades minor hockey. The Canadian system produces good players, but is also encourages some of the country's best athletes to quit hockey and take up another sport. And it explains why tremendously skilled players rarely emerge from our game.


et maintenant ..la discussion est ouverte :-)

#16

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Effectivement pour étoffer le dernier article en voici un autre:

http://www.smarthock... ... 0840244105

#17
sob

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Salut psupply,

Je connais le 21 days de Vincent et effectivement c'est un excellent programme, le jeune pratique hors et sur glace( en hiver comme en été selon la saison) et un suivi est fait sur l'ordi... Je n'ai pas vue ce produits ici au quebec mais dans les Martitimes....je ne sais pas si c' est disponible en français mais cela vaut vraiement la peine.... et ce pour tout âge... et je sais qu'une ecole ici dans la région de Montreal offre maintenant des sessions dans le genre mais ce n'est pas donné.... $$$$

#18

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Est-ce l'école Nadeau-Leblanc par hasard?

#19
sob

sob
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exacto mon ami ... mais je sais pas ce que cela à l'air...


#20
Pete(Beauce-Nord)

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je croit que sans hockey contact dans le hockey mineur je croit que je ne serait plus un joueur de hockey cest pour cela que je continue a jouer!




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